Saturday, May 10th 2014

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Source: lesbeehive.com
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Source: ball-of-wool
lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Ellen Page by Nino Munez for FLARE June 2014
When I remark that she seemed nervous that night, Page smiles her trademark half-smile and acquiesces with a laugh, a sigh and some rat-a-tat repetition. “I was very nervous. I was very nervous, yes. Yes. Very, very nervous. Yes. I was emotional, deeply, deeply emotional.” Though she told her parents she liked-liked girls when she was 19, she was still coming out to herself eight years on. “You think you’re in a place where you’re all I’m thrilled to be gay, I have no issues about being gay anymore, I don’t feel shame about being gay, but you actually do. You’re just not fully aware of it. I think I still felt scared about people knowing. I felt awkward around gay people; I felt guilty for not being myself.”

lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Ellen Page by Nino Munez for FLARE June 2014

When I remark that she seemed nervous that night, Page smiles her trademark half-smile and acquiesces with a laugh, a sigh and some rat-a-tat repetition. “I was very nervous. I was very nervous, yes. Yes. Very, very nervous. Yes. I was emotional, deeply, deeply emotional.” Though she told her parents she liked-liked girls when she was 19, she was still coming out to herself eight years on. “You think you’re in a place where you’re all I’m thrilled to be gay, I have no issues about being gay anymore, I don’t feel shame about being gay, but you actually do. You’re just not fully aware of it. I think I still felt scared about people knowing. I felt awkward around gay people; I felt guilty for not being myself.”

(via homicidalbrunette)

3146
Source: lesbeehive.com

Angelina Jolie on her children’s reaction upon seeing “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”

(via dailyangelinajolie)

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Source: angieficent
871
Source: lesbeehive.com
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Source: theowlswalkwithme
lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Coming out to my Christian Parents and other hilarious anecdotes from my youth by Su Abeille
"Are you mad at me?" I asked her fearfully.
"Oh no. The homosexuality we can cure. It’s this witchcraft we’re worried about."
She said this with complete confidence.  (My family would attempt to dissuade my ‘lifestyle choices’ as she would later call them, but that’s a story for another time.)  The assurance with which she spoke this sentence shocked me in a way that still resonances now.  I repeated it in my head for days, months afterwards, trying to actualize that she would honestly believe this.  It didn’t fully hit home for me until a couple of years later when helping my parents pack, I found books about ‘converting homosexuals’ in my Dad’s office. I had been out of the house over a year at this point, awed by the freedom of my own space. Seeing these books pulled me right back down again, reminded me that this was not something that my parents accepted, not in the slightest. All their affirmations of parental love, their insistence that they still did love me no matter were proved false by their actions.  They didn’t accept this part of me.  There were conditions on their love.  My mom told me once a few months after I came out that she loved me but hated the gay part of me.  This is not love. Love accepts all parts and judges not.
My parents’ continuous refusal to accept and love who I really am is something I had to work through during most of my twenties.   I allowed myself to feel anger, betrayal, abandonment, and lived with those negative emotions inside me for a long time.  It wasn’t until I saw ignorance as a cage they were seemingly forever trapped in that I was able to not attach their limitations to my sense of self.  I have never made excuses or apologies for their treatment of me, rather felt pity towards them.  They refuse to change their minds on basic human emotions, hide behind their prejudices – these are facts I can’t change about them.  All I can change is how I will not allow their ignorant opinion to determine my reaction to those around me.
READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE ON LESBEEHIVE
The above photograph is from 2002 and is one of the first pictures that my lady Bo took of me when we first met. Pictured is my queer wiccan altar, my video tape collection and my Lolita poster, three of the most important things to me during my early 20s after I moved out of my parents’ house.

lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Coming out to my Christian Parents and other hilarious anecdotes from my youth by Su Abeille

"Are you mad at me?" I asked her fearfully.

"Oh no. The homosexuality we can cure. It’s this witchcraft we’re worried about."

She said this with complete confidence.  (My family would attempt to dissuade my ‘lifestyle choices’ as she would later call them, but that’s a story for another time.)  The assurance with which she spoke this sentence shocked me in a way that still resonances now.  I repeated it in my head for days, months afterwards, trying to actualize that she would honestly believe this.  It didn’t fully hit home for me until a couple of years later when helping my parents pack, I found books about ‘converting homosexuals’ in my Dad’s office. I had been out of the house over a year at this point, awed by the freedom of my own space. Seeing these books pulled me right back down again, reminded me that this was not something that my parents accepted, not in the slightest. All their affirmations of parental love, their insistence that they still did love me no matter were proved false by their actions.  They didn’t accept this part of me.  There were conditions on their love.  My mom told me once a few months after I came out that she loved me but hated the gay part of me.  This is not love. Love accepts all parts and judges not.

My parents’ continuous refusal to accept and love who I really am is something I had to work through during most of my twenties.   I allowed myself to feel anger, betrayal, abandonment, and lived with those negative emotions inside me for a long time.  It wasn’t until I saw ignorance as a cage they were seemingly forever trapped in that I was able to not attach their limitations to my sense of self.  I have never made excuses or apologies for their treatment of me, rather felt pity towards them.  They refuse to change their minds on basic human emotions, hide behind their prejudices – these are facts I can’t change about them.  All I can change is how I will not allow their ignorant opinion to determine my reaction to those around me.

READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE ON LESBEEHIVE

The above photograph is from 2002 and is one of the first pictures that my lady Bo took of me when we first met. Pictured is my queer wiccan altar, my video tape collection and my Lolita poster, three of the most important things to me during my early 20s after I moved out of my parents’ house.

(via homicidalbrunette)

257
Source: lesbeehive.com
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Source: womenneverreallyfaint
lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Ellen Page by Olivia Malone for Hollywood Reporter May 2014

Says Page, “I get more hate, honestly, about dressing androgynously than about being gay.”

lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Ellen Page by Olivia Malone for Hollywood Reporter May 2014

Says Page, “I get more hate, honestly, about dressing androgynously than about being gay.”

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Source: lesbeehive.com
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Source: queen-angelina

Friday, May 9th 2014

lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Ellen Page by Olivia Malone for Hollywood Reporter May 2014

Says Page, “I get more hate, honestly, about dressing androgynously than about being gay.”

lesbeehive:

Les Beehive – Ellen Page by Olivia Malone for Hollywood Reporter May 2014

Says Page, “I get more hate, honestly, about dressing androgynously than about being gay.”

(via lesbowie)

5603
Source: lesbeehive.com

Disney villains are quite loved by the gay community. How do you feel about being an inspiration for drag queens?

(via dailyangelinajolie)

Tag(s): omg How precious is this press tour going to get I ask you

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Source: queen-angelina
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Source: lesbeehive.com

miaswasikowska:

Ellen Page for the Hollywood Reporter

(via jetgirl78)

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Source: judidenchs
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Source: lesbeehive.com
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