Wednesday, June 26th 2013

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer reviewed by Suicide Blonde
I read this story based solely on praise I had heard for Krakauer’s work.  About 10 pages in, realizing fully what the book was about I was alternating between scoffing and eye-rolling at the selfish ridiculousness of what this child had done. Coming from this initial reaction, the fact that I ended up enjoying this book so much is a major testament to Jon Krakauer’s talent as a storyteller. I’ll be damned if this crafty motherfucker didn’t win me over.
Do I think what this spoilt kid did was epic and the stuff of legends? No. Did this authour make me remember the sweeping and all-encompassing passions of being in your late teens/early twenties that make you do stupid things and not listen to any of the common sense advice from those wiser than you? Yes, yes he did. Did I learn a little about myself from reading this book? Well sure. The real hero from this story isn’t an impetuous child who’s been immortalized for his recklessness, like so many before (and surely many after him.) It’s the author who helped make readers judge not, lest they be judged.

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer reviewed by Suicide Blonde

I read this story based solely on praise I had heard for Krakauer’s work.  About 10 pages in, realizing fully what the book was about I was alternating between scoffing and eye-rolling at the selfish ridiculousness of what this child had done. Coming from this initial reaction, the fact that I ended up enjoying this book so much is a major testament to Jon Krakauer’s talent as a storyteller. I’ll be damned if this crafty motherfucker didn’t win me over.

Do I think what this spoilt kid did was epic and the stuff of legends? No. Did this authour make me remember the sweeping and all-encompassing passions of being in your late teens/early twenties that make you do stupid things and not listen to any of the common sense advice from those wiser than you? Yes, yes he did. Did I learn a little about myself from reading this book? Well sure. The real hero from this story isn’t an impetuous child who’s been immortalized for his recklessness, like so many before (and surely many after him.) It’s the author who helped make readers judge not, lest they be judged.

Tag(s): Jon Krakauer Into the Wild book review book reviews suicideblonde Christopher McCandless

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